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Success or Failure?? 1st Time 100% hydration Ciabatta

62 Views 5 Replies 3 Participants Last post by  LeonardoDaBenz
5
At this point, I don't know.

I've made really sticky bread before (rye bread is VERY sticky) and is fairly high hydration (80% or so) but today I'm trying something as an experiment.

100% hydration.

For those that don't know, hydration is the ratio of water to flour. 80% means:

100% flour (so say 1000gm)
80% water (so 800gm)

I'm making ciabatta bread at 100% today. Ingredients are basically the same (flour, water, salt yeast) but the water is way above what I normally use.

Well, this dough is so slack, it looks like
Wood Font Art Personal protective equipment Illustration


Well, it's an experiment and what can go wrong? Actually, nothing.

Here they are at the "melting" stage (like above)
Food Ingredient Cuisine Staple food Comfort food


Slack dough cannot be kneaded, no how no way. 4 sets of folds (two min each) and then a final rest (as above) for 30 min then bake for 20-25 min.

AND tada
Food Ingredient Staple food Recipe Baked goods


Those are roughly 3"x3" and 4"x6" and well, the size is what I managed to move from proofing sheet to baking sheet.

Just out of the oven so no pics of the inside yet. I'll add that when they've cooled off/finished cooking inside.

After cooling for 30 min, time to cut and see.
Food Tableware Table Dishware Plate


and cut in half
Food Ingredient Recipe Cuisine Staple food


Holes aren't quite as big as I hoped but man, the flavour? Out of this world. AND the crust "crackles" when cut. The insides are so tender and soft 馃グ

For how good these are with a high yeast/quick (3hr) rise, I can say that doing this as an overnight rise, the flavour would be even better. If that's possible.

For those that want to try, there are ciabatta recipes that use less than 100% hydration and if you're interested, I would suggest trying those before 100%.

Definitely on my "save" list now (y)
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At this point, I don't know.

I've made really sticky bread before (rye bread is VERY sticky) and is fairly high hydration (80% or so) but today I'm trying something as an experiment.

100% hydration.

For those that don't know, hydration is the ratio of water to flour. 80% means:

100% flour (so say 1000gm)
80% water (so 800gm)

I'm making ciabatta bread at 100% today. Ingredients are basically the same (flour, water, salt yeast) but the water is way above what I normally use.

Well, this dough is so slack, it looks like
View attachment 1324

Well, it's an experiment and what can go wrong? Actually, nothing.

Here they are at the "melting" stage (like above)
View attachment 1326

Slack dough cannot be kneaded, no how no way. 4 sets of folds (two min each) and then a final rest (as above) for 30 min then bake for 20-25 min.

AND tada
View attachment 1325

Those are roughly 3"x3" and 4"x6" and well, the size is what I managed to move from proofing sheet to baking sheet.

Just out of the oven so no pics of the inside yet. I'll add that when they've cooled off/finished cooking inside.

After cooling for 30 min, time to cut and see.
View attachment 1328

and cut in half
View attachment 1329

Holes aren't quite as big as I hoped but man, the flavour? Out of this world. AND the crust "crackles" when cut. The insides are so tender and soft 馃グ

For how good these are with a high yeast/quick (3hr) rise, I can say that doing this as an overnight rise, the flavour would be even better. If that's possible.

For those that want to try, there are ciabatta recipes that use less than 100% hydration and if you're interested, I would suggest trying those before 100%.

Definitely on my "save" list now (y)
Looks amazing!
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Congrats. I've never been brave enough to do that.
Congrats. I've never been brave enough to do that.
Ya, the slackness of the dough (it's more batter than dough) is challenging.

Really though, I really believe you can't mess this up. Just make sure you use a bowl that is about 3x the size of the mixxing bowl (for the rise). That recipe I linked to recommends a square tub. Didn't have one so just made do with my set of nesting pyrex bowls.

AND make sure you have a bench scraper (I use a ~6-7" metal one) for the cutting/lifting onto the baking sheet. You can just use your hands BUT the dough after the final rise is still like that clock in post 1. It has NO solidity to it and needs the support of the bench scraper.

Used a cookie sheet with silpat sheet on top. Watch your baking time (15-20 min for buns OR about 25 min for a loaf).

The taste will be worth your initial (but unwarrented) worry.
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It's been said that these are best eaten day of. Who in their right mind are going to eat 8-10 buns in one day (unless you have a big family).

SO, they freeze quite nicely. Which is what I did.

The best part is: when I want one, take it out of the freezer about an hour before and keep it in a plastic bag to defrost.

Then set toaster oven at 350. Then give the TOP of the bun a LIGHT spritz of water (I just turn the tap on/sprayer on and ......zip the top under the water (like a wave, don't want it soaking NOR do you want the bottom wet).

Into the toaster oven for 5 minutes and it comes out hot and CRISP like the day it was baked.

That bit of water steams off the top of the bun and crisps it up perfectly.
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