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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let's talk about Scrapple.
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I did not realize how regional this food was until I began sojourning across the country. Scrapple is really only found in the Mid-Atlantic and occasionally Ohio and West Virginia.

North Carolina has a similar breakfast meat called 'liver mush' which is rather more organ based and meaty than Yankee scrapple. Scrapple is, by my estimation, usually a 60-40 blend of pork parts and cornmeal mush with a touch of wheat probably to get some gluten to aid in binding the stuff together. Could be 50-50 in some brands.

I was at a convention in NC a couple of years ago and some of us were eating a hearty breakfast in Concord before we went down to the meetings for the day. Liver mush was on the menu and a female member of the party asked what that was. I described it as a variation of scrapple, which got her excited as she had grown up in PA. She found liver mush rather more rich than the scrapple she grew up with.

You slice it and fry it. It's typically served with scrambled eggs or on a sandwich. Maple syrup or something sweet is considered an appropriate condiment. My wife ate it a few times and thought it was alright until she looked at the package. The pork snouts were a full stop for her! There are a lot of regional brands in PA but Rapa is probably the most common brand across the Mid-Atlantic.
 

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Let's talk about Scrapple.
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I did not realize how regional this food was until I began sojourning across the country. Scrapple is really only found in the Mid-Atlantic and occasionally Ohio and West Virginia.

North Carolina has a similar breakfast meat called 'liver mush' which is rather more organ based and meaty than Yankee scrapple. Scrapple is, by my estimation, usually a 60-40 blend of pork parts and cornmeal mush with a touch of wheat probably to get some gluten to aid in binding the stuff together. Could be 50-50 in some brands.

I was at a convention in NC a couple of years ago and some of us were eating a hearty breakfast in Concord before we went down to the meetings for the day. Liver mush was on the menu and a female member of the party asked what that was. I described it as a variation of scrapple, which got her excited as she had grown up in PA. She found liver mush rather more rich than the scrapple she grew up with.

You slice it and fry it. It's typically served with scrambled eggs or on a sandwich. Maple syrup or something sweet is considered an appropriate condiment. My wife ate it a few times and thought it was alright until she looked at the package. The pork snouts were a full stop for her! There are a lot of regional brands in PA but Rapa is probably the most common brand across the Mid-Atlantic.
Never had scrapple. But I have had liver mush. It was at lunch that someone brought in. Liver mush sliced on white bread with mayo. It was okay. Different is a better word. The guy that made it was not a very good cook even though he thinks he is.
So he gave me some to take home. I fried it and hated it. So very cold on bread with mayo seems like the only way I would like it. Or maybe have some prepared by someone who really knows what they are doing.

Never heard of it and I think I might continue that trend. I hate liver in any form.
Most people don't like liver. I like it a lot. Made liver and onions the other night. Ice cold calves liver (semi frozen just enough so you can get them apart). It comes sliced and frozen. I don't buy fresh liver.
I marinate them it in fresh lime juice, granulated garlic, salt & pepper and raw onions piled on top. I keep it as cold as possible so I can dredge them in flour before frying. I fry the onions first then the flour dredged liver. I then make a gravy in the same pan for mashed potato's. Buttered green beans and rolls tops off an amazing dinner.
I believe calves liver is milder than regular beef liver and they are smaller.
 

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[QUOTE="Roll_Bones, post: 3367, member:
Most people don't like liver. I like it a lot. Made liver and onions the other night. Ice cold calves liver (semi frozen just enough so you can get them apart). It comes sliced and frozen. I don't buy fresh liver.
I marinate them it in fresh lime juice, granulated garlic, salt & pepper and raw onions piled on top. I keep it as cold as possible so I can dredge them in flour before frying. I fry the onions first then the flour dredged liver. I then make a gravy in the same pan for mashed potato's. Buttered green beans and rolls tops off an amazing dinner.
I believe calves liver is milder than regular beef liver and they are smaller.
[/QUOTE]
Gad I'm in love. Liver and onions, it doesn't get any better unless you put it over rice with lots of gravy.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well that isn't any worse than chorizo.
Speaking of chorizo, I was eating some this morning. I bought it at my favorite local butcher shop. The flavor is okay, too mild, but the texture is just not right. There's no offal or even tongue in it and it makes a difference. Kroger has Cacique most of the time but that's as good as it gets in these parts. As an aside, I think the Johnsonville chorizo misses just about every mark for the style.
 

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Speaking of chorizo, I was eating some this morning. I bought it at my favorite local butcher shop. The flavor is okay, too mild, but the texture is just not right. There's no offal or even tongue in it and it makes a difference. Kroger has Cacique most of the time but that's as good as it gets in these parts. As an aside, I think the Johnsonville chorizo misses just about every mark for the style.
Yeah it's a matter of taste I guess. Cacique and the locally made brands all have offal in them and I don't care to eat them so that leave Johnsvilles if the store has it or Longanzia which to me tastes similar to chorizo. There are options I know of to make your own. I have an authentic Mexican recipe and try it but it didn't work out for me, don't know why, and a seasoning mix. I have this mix but haven't tried it yet. Bolner's Fiesta Brand Chorizo mix. Either from Amazon or direct from Bolner's Ground meat prices coming down though.



Less than half of Amazon price.

 

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I despise liver of any kind in its natural state. Even the smell of it cooking will drive me out of the house until the stench dissipates. Livermush is right straight out because it stinks of liver when cooking. So for those of you who love liver, please enjoy my helpings. :D

Scrapple I adore. The liver smell and taste are sufficiently low that I can really enjoy it, especially when it's fresh made by the Amish when I can get it.
 

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Speaking of chorizo, I was eating some this morning. I bought it at my favorite local butcher shop. The flavor is okay, too mild, but the texture is just not right. There's no offal or even tongue in it and it makes a difference. Kroger has Cacique most of the time but that's as good as it gets in these parts. As an aside, I think the Johnsonville chorizo misses just about every mark for the style.
The only way I have found to get the real dry cured chorizo is online or in a European market. There is a brand that comes in a can and is popular in Cuban markets. They sausages are packed in lard. In fact if you get chorizo from a Cuban source you most likely can count on good stuff.


I despise liver of any kind in its natural state. Even the smell of it cooking will drive me out of the house until the stench dissipates. Livermush is right straight out because it stinks of liver when cooking. So for those of you who love liver, please enjoy my helpings. :D

Scrapple I adore. The liver smell and taste are sufficiently low that I can really enjoy it, especially when it's fresh made by the Amish when I can get it.
Calves liver for us is a 'once and awhile' thing. I could not eat it every week. Its so rich.
But I could eat chicken livers every day. *Pate' or crispy deep fried with Franks hot sauce for dipping. Heaven.

* A whole thread of its own.
 

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Calves liver for us is a 'once and awhile' thing. I could not eat it every week. Its so rich.
But I could eat chicken livers every day. *Pate' or crispy deep fried with Franks hot sauce for dipping. Heaven.

* A whole thread of its own.
When I was little I thought eating liver was nasty. As I grew up, my mother became active showing dogs and cooked liver to train them. Initially she boiled it to death, then when I was a teen she got the "bright idea" to cook it until it was like shoe leather in the microwave. Those were the days I disappeared until the smell dissipated.
 

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But I could eat chicken livers every day.
My introduction to chicken livers as a kid was at my grandmother's apartment. To say she was "not a cook" would be kind. All manner of borderline-inedible meals she prepared that we had to eat out of politeness and no alternatives. Still scarred for life on the chicken livers.

Not much of a fan of beef liver either. My mom loved the dish but she was the only one in the house (Dad was game enough to get through it but he didn't enjoy it either). Eventually she settled for eating it at restaurants. The smell is fine. I just can't handle the texture or the taste.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
My introduction to chicken livers as a kid was at my grandmother's apartment. To say she was "not a cook" would be kind. All manner of borderline-inedible meals she prepared that we had to eat out of politeness and no alternatives. Still scarred for life on the chicken livers.

Not much of a fan of beef liver either. My mom loved the dish but she was the only one in the house (Dad was game enough to get through it but he didn't enjoy it either). Eventually she settled for eating it at restaurants. The smell is fine. I just can't handle the texture or the taste.
I live right by a diner. The lady who runs it is a neighbor. She sometimes puts liver and onions on her sign for the specials.
 

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When I was little I thought eating liver was nasty. As I grew up, my mother became active showing dogs and cooked liver to train them. Initially she boiled it to death, then when I was a teen she got the "bright idea" to cook it until it was like shoe leather in the microwave. Those were the days I disappeared until the smell dissipated.
Over cooking any liver is a big mistake.
I live right by a diner. The lady who runs it is a neighbor. She sometimes puts liver and onions on her sign for the specials.
When my wife and I were dating we used to meet at Shoney's for dinner 1 night week. It was liver and onions night. It was great and those days bring back some fine memories.
 
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