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Discussion Starter · #21 · (Edited)
How do you remove the membrane? I've never been able to. I just score between the ribs on both sides before cooking.
Easy peasy.

Meat side down/membrane up.

Start with the narrow end to your left/wide end to your right (I'm right handed so do this opposite if you are not).

Slip a table knife (like a butter knife, NOT a pointy/sharp one) between the bone and the membrane. Just wiggle it a bit till you get under it. Lever the membrane up with the knife till you you've got it free across the rib. It'll be about 1/4 to 1/2" wide and the width of the rack.

Get a paper towel, grasp that little flap of membrane and pull it slowly (I go from left to right) to the right, almost like pulling dead skin off your arm when you're peeling after a sun burn.

Do it slowly but firmly. It may split as you pull but try to angle it back so the whole piece eventually comes to the end (that flap is the half of the pig's diaphram) and pull it off. If it does split, just keep pulling to get part off. Then do the same levering action under the membrane where there is a bigger rib and -->lift and pull just like when you started.

There will be a little left under that flap but it is of no consequence.

NOW: note that there are really TWO membranes there. The one you just pulled off and a second one underneath.

DO NOT REMOVE that underlying membrane. It is holding the meat/bones together and if you remove it, well everything will kind of fall apart. It cooks nicely so leave it alone.

Lots of vids / here's one. He struggles at the beginning but eventually gets the idea 馃槈
 

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I have always cooked them low & slow as wife likes the meat moist. This time I will try a quick trip under the broiler.

Sadly it is almost warm enough to do them outside today. Almost! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I have always cooked them low & slow as wife likes the meat moist. This time I will try a quick trip under the broiler.

Sadly it is almost warm enough to do them outside today. Almost! :)
AND that's a good way to do it but because we're doing them wrapped in foil, the heat can be bumped (for a shorter cook time) and they'll stay nice and moist.

Just like doing a "high heat" brisket and using "the texas crutch" to speed through "the stall".

The foil can be used on any cook but just works particularly well here.
 

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I have always cooked them low & slow as wife likes the meat moist. This time I will try a quick trip under the broiler.

Sadly it is almost warm enough to do them outside today. Almost! :)
If it wasn't for the wind, today would be a great day to cook outside. It was nice the other night so we cooked burgers on the gas grill. Its my 23 year old Weber Genesis Silver grill my parents bought me for my birthday. It is by far the best gas grill I have cooked on.
I disassembled, cleaned and lubed the gas valves so I just had to test it out. Success as usual with Weber. Easy to.
I have replaced everything except the burners. I hope it outlives me. Oh wait! I hope I outlive it!
 

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AND that's a good way to do it but because we're doing them wrapped in foil, the heat can be bumped (for a shorter cook time) and they'll stay nice and moist.

Just like doing a "high heat" brisket and using "the texas crutch" to speed through "the stall".

The foil can be used on any cook but just works particularly well here.

It did a nice job. See post in the shrimp thread.
 
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