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Rye Bread but

67 Views 7 Replies 4 Participants Last post by  Wooleybooger
baked in a pullman loaf pan.

I do Lahey-type no knead breads exclusively but also vary the ingredients. I'll do two all white bread on occasion but will frequently change it up. As I grind my own flour, I have

1)wheat grain
2)rye grain
3)spelt grain

grains that I will blend with unbleached a.p. flour to create variations. I've gone as high as 60% whole wheat but prefer 40%.

Always weighing, I measure 600gm ap flour and 400gm rye grain. Grind the rye and then the usual mixing. I like the fact it uses minimal yeast (3/4t for 1000gm of flour) (y).

So you know, a usual 454gm loaf use 2 1/4 t !

Today I had a hankering for rye so...40% rye bread. The recipe I use makes 2 loaves that I invariably use 2 dutch ovens to get that super brown crusty "artisan" boule look.

SWMBO has been bugging me for "sandwich" style loaves. Boules don't lend themselves to sandwiches as they are typically round.

SO, I used my no-knead variation (in full) using pullman loaf pans. I have a 1 lb and 2lb pullman pan and figured that the big pan could hold the dough (which in total comes to 2.2 lb).

Nope, not gonna happen. Put the dough in the big pan and it basically filled it to the top, not leaving any head space for the last rise.

Ok, cut 1/3 off the dough and used the two pans. The big one was perfect but not quite enough dough for the little one (so the top is not "squared off").

Well, after baking and cooling, I dunno but this bread was the best I've ever made. AND my loaves always turn out to my liking.

Pics or it didn't happen so here they are (with the small one missing a few slices 馃槈 ) A nice tight crumb (that you don't get doing it the "artisan" way).

Food Ingredient Sliced bread Graham bread Cake
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Do you ever work with millet? I love it.
Not yet. The grain I buy comes in 20lb bags so takes a while to go through. On my list though (y)
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You grind your own rye to make the rye flour?

Do you have a recipe or more info. I might may want to learn to bake a single loaf.
Ya, I have a grain grinder. Two main 'competitors' in machines IMO. I have this one


IF you have a white bread (ie 100% ap flour) recipe (most any will do), just substitute some of the ap with rye flour (rye flour being available most everywhere in small bags). I would limit it to 20% substitution to start with and then the water component really needs no adjustment.

This is why using weight not "cups" to measure ingredients is so important. Grams are easiest IMO.

SO, if the recipe you have calls for 4C of ap flour, that is darn close to 500gm. 20% is 100gm so

-400gm ap
-100gm rye (or whatever you want to sub in--like millet 馃槈 )
-rest of ingredients are unchanged

If you use rye, it is extremely sticky and is a challenge to shape for the novice.

Normally you add more water when using rye as it is a water sponge but for so little used here, not really needed to adjust. Rye bread is usually around 72% hydration and white bread around 50% (but can vary, depending on how YOU want to adjust it--humidity, proofing, etc (look up "baker's percentages" and you'll see what I'm referring to).

It is a very simple substitution and as I said, any "white bread" recipe can be used with appropriate substitution(s).
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A friend of mine in Missouri uses a Country Living mill. He grinds wheat, coffee and any other thing he want with it. This is a serious hand grinder and can be motorized.

A friend of mine in Missouri uses a Country Living mill. He grinds wheat, coffee and any other thing he want with it. This is a serious hand grinder and can be motorized.

At almost $700 US for a manual grinder, that is one pricey (but good lookin') piece of hardware. IF you're a survivalist, it would be the thing to have.
At almost $700 US for a manual grinder, that is one pricey (but good lookin') piece of hardware. IF you're a survivalist, it would be the thing to have.
:ROFLMAO: They are. Lives in the boonies, buys wheat berries and white flour from the Amish, grinds their own WW flour, etc.
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